What is Plan S?

What is Plan S?

Plan S is a strategy to accelerate the transition to full Open Access of Research. It is being put forward by a group of European research funders called cOAlition S. This group includes UKRI, the ERC and the Wellcome Trust

Does this affect the REF?

Research England have confirmed that the OA policy for REF 2021 will not change but the UKRI is currently conducting a review of Open Access which will report in late 2019 with a new policy expected to apply in 2020.

Will the University of Bristol implement Plan S?

The University requires our researchers to comply with the requirements of their individual funders. The Wellcome Trust have already released a new policy in line with Plan S and the Library will support researchers in meeting the requirements of these policies wherever possible.

When does it take effect?

Officially, Plan S comes into effect on the 1st of January 2020 and The Wellcome Trust has already  announced their policy will come into effect on that date. We have not as yet had confirmation from other funders when any other policies will come into effect.

What will Open Access look like under Plan S?

Gold (Paid) Open Access

Gold (paid) open access, will be possible in gold-only open access journals where paying a fee is the only way to publish (e.g. Nature Communications, PloS One). An Article Processing Charge (APC) will still be charged, but there is an expectation that the charge will be capped so that there is a maximum amount a publisher can charge. We do not know what this amount will be yet.

The article will need to be made openly available on the publisher’s website immediately on publication under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) or Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike (CC-BY-SA) licence.

The journal will pay for its operating costs from the revenue gained by Article Processing Charges.

Green (Self-Archiving) Open Access

Green (self-archiving) open access will still be possible, but only if the publisher allowed the Author’s Accepted Manuscript to be made available upon publication without an embargo. At the moment, some publishers allow this (SAGE, IEEE, Cambridge University Press’ Humanities and Social Sciences journals) but many other publishers would need to change their policies.

The article will need to be made openly available on Explore Bristol Research, by uploading a copy to Pure (or other trusted repository), immediately on publication under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) or Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike (CC-BY-SA) licence.

The journal will pay for its operating costs from subscriptions bought by libraries and other organisations that would benefit from seamless access to its articles.

Hybrid Open Access

Plan S will not allow funding for publication in hybrid journals (those that charge both subscription fees and Article Processing Charges).

It may be temporarily possible to pay for Gold open access in these hybrid journals, while transitional arrangements to move to full open access are put in place by the publishers. We don’t know which publishers will have approved transitional agreements at this stage

Will I still be able to publish where I want?

That depends upon what the publishers decide. If they change their open access policies to be compliant with Plan S, then you will be able to publish with them.

Under Plan S funders and institutions are expected to provide funds to pay for Gold-only Article Processing Charges (or approved publishers in the processing of transitioning to full open access). If funds are not available then you will either have to obtain a waiver from the publisher, or publish somewhere else.

If the journal is Green open access then you will need to be able to upload your Author’s Accepted Manuscript to Pure (or other trusted repository) without an embargo. If the publisher does not permit this then you will be unable to publish there.

What other changes are required?

Plan S also requires authors to retain their copyright and not to transfer this to the publisher when signing a publishing agreement.

What support will the library provide?

The Library will continue to support the institutional repository service for researchers to upload their work. We will continue to provide access to any Open Access funds provided by funding agencies or the University. And we will continue to provide support, advice, training and guidance on Open Access and how best to comply with funder and publisher requirements.

Summary of the Changes

  • Authors must retain copyright in their publications
  • Publications must be published under an open licence, preferably CC-BY
  • The research output must be immediately available without an embargo period
  • Green open access may be compliant if the research output is immediately available on publication
  • Publishing in hybrid (ie subscription-based) journals is not allowed
  • There will be a cap on the maximum allowable fee for open access publication costs

Further Information

Guidance on the implementation of Plan S

Opportunity to feedback on Plan S (open until 1st February)

New Wellcome Trust Policy (to start on 1st Jan 2020)

If you have any queries related to the above please contact lib-research-support@bristol.ac.uk

Unlocking Open Access – Kopernio

Kopernio is an extension for your internet browser that quickly tells you if you have access to a version of the journal article that you are looking at. It detects when you are looking at an article’s page and, if you have access through either the library’s subscriptions or through an Open Access version, it will provide a link to the document.

The extension also keeps a record of articles you downloaded so you can find them again easily and can export a list of references to a .bib file for use with BibTeX.

The video gives a good indication of how the extension works. Why not try it out next time you’re looking for journal articles?

You can find Kopernio at https://kopernio.com/

The extension will work in Chrome or Firefox.

Edit: This extension was previously known as Canary Haz. We have updated the information here to reflect the new name and website.

Unlocking Open Access – Open Access DOIs

You’ve seen DOI numbers before. But did you know that you can use them to link to Open Access versions of articles?

DOI stands for Digital Object Identifier. They are unique identifying numbers for online publications, such as electronic journal articles. A DOI will look something like this: 10.1093/mind/fzr010

You can use a DOI to find a paper by pasting the DOI into the following format: https://doi.org/XXXXXXX.

Using the DOI from above, we’d get https://doi.org/10.1093/mind/fzr010

But, the above journal article is on a publisher’s website which hides the full text behind a paywall. You may have access thanks to the subscriptions provided by library services. But if not, you can try using Open Access DOIs to find an open access version.

The format for OADOIs is: https://oadoi.org/XXXXXXX

So with our example we would get: https://oadoi.org/10.1093/mind/fzr010

This looks for any Open Access versions and, if it finds any, it links you to one of them, rather than the publisher’s site.

This is a good trick for finding an Open Access version of an article you already know. It can also be a good way to link your readers to an open version of your work, ensuring they can read it.

Unlocking Open Access – Unpaywall

We talk a lot about uploading your articles to Pure so other researchers can benefit from Open Access. But we rarely talk about how you can use Open Access to benefit your own research. In this series of blog posts, we’ll show you some simple ways to find Open Access articles. First up: Unpaywall.

Unpaywall

A screenshot of a paywalled article, with the open padlock logo of Unpaywall on the right hand side of the page
The open padlock icon on the right hand side of the page shows that an open access version is available. Clicking the icon will take you to the article.

You’re searching for useful papers for your research. But the library can’t afford a subscription to all the journals you need. Papers hidden behind paywalls are a constant frustration. You could ask the library to get copies for you, but you’re on a tight schedule. You’d rather get that paper now.

Unpaywall is the solution. This browser extension adds an icon to your screen that lets you know if an Open Access version of the paper you’re trying to view is available. Click that and you’ll be reading the full text in seconds.

You can add the extension to Google Chrome or Firefox, even on university computers. Once you do, it’s always on and checking to see if it can provide a link to an Open Access version. If so, it’ll add an unobtrusive open padlock icon to the right of the screen, which will take you to the full text.

This is the easiest way we’ve seen to add Open Access to your research strategy. You can add Unpaywall to your browser here: http://unpaywall.org/